The above image was shared on social media, and it absolutely floored me. Part of that is because we don’t get trees like this in the part of the world in which I grew up. So I’m always impressed when I see one of these Jurassic-sized pieces of nature exploding into the sky. But this? Just wow.

It’s always remarkable when nature and art collide in this way, but there’s something really powerful to see this kind of thing: a tree was felled by lightning, and the brokenness exposed this column of wood. A person came, saw in it something of themselves, and they carved a little synechdoche — a part of a person to stand in for the whole of ourselves that reaches up and our, tree-like, into the world, into the universe.

A small, but profound video hit me in just the right spot this week, and I’m sharing it with you all. You can look at the video here.

The images are grainy and hard to see, so take a look at this on your computer if you can’t see it…

The above was widely shared across social media. But in doing so, it created a lightning rod around an issue that we are ALL sharing in and suffering through during the year of COVID. This year SUCKS for birthdays.

If you’ve had a birthday, you know what I mean. If…

Turkish Film Pioneers

I tend to think of French or American silent films when I think of the beginnings of the medium. It was a technology that, clearly, still shapes the world, but the ability to capture things happening in the world and playing it back later was even more…

So this blew me away in a “huh! I didn’t think that was possible” kind of way.

The story is from biologists studying the fauna of the Seychelles. Like many islands close to continents, the Seychelles have a history of ships landing on the islands and being exploited to the…

The idea of the sad clown was put on stage in the famous depiction of Pagliaccio in Ruggero Leoncavallo’s opera of the same name. It’s probably the operatic image that most non-opera-goers might know — imagining Pavoratti in clown make up singing the famous aria:

Laugh, clown, so the crowd…

In preparation for the coming church year, I’ve been looking at some older books on class in America. (You have to look for older writings because, with a few notable exceptions, we seem to have stopped thinking about class in America.) While reading from Paul Fussell’s Class: A Guide Through…

Something about Summertime always makes me whimsically nostalgic. It is a season in which I will eat food that isn’t reasonable to consume for someone who isn’t 12 or under. It is a season in which I will intentionally drive long distances at night just to put the windows down…

I talked to a friend of mine (he’s a Catholic theologian and a long time lover of comicbooks) about my thoughts about comic books after I posted about it on this blog. He told me that he’d been thinking a lot about comic book movies himself. Specifically he’d been thinking…

The critics have been hating on super hero movies since they started to show up in their newly expansive form, about ten years ago. They are an extension of the tradition of the “Summer Blockbuster,” which has always defined a kind of movie most critics find unserious. Even where a…

Dr. Allan T. Georgia

Dr. Georgia is the D.R.E. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Cleveland, OH.

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